ClickFlare Workspaces: Public vs. Private

Optimize Your Workflow with ClickFlare's Public and Private Workspaces: A Comprehensive Guide for Enhanced Collaboration
E
Written by Ervis
Updated 3 weeks ago

In ClickFlare, you'll find two distinct types of workspaces:

  • Public Workspace: A shared area facilitating collaboration where campaign elements can be shared among users. Both Account Owners and Admins have the authority to create and modify elements within this space, which Workers can then utilize in their campaigns. Every account has a default Public Workspace, and it cannot be removed.
  • Private Workspace: An exclusive area created by the Account Owner or Admins to segregate workloads for Workers. Workers are assigned to specific Private Workspaces by the Account Owner or Admins, confining their permissions solely to that workspace. They can operate on private campaign elements within the assigned workspace and incorporate public campaign elements into their campaigns. Each account can have up to 50 Private Workspaces.

ACCESS LEVELS IN WORKSPACES FOR YOU AND YOUR TEAM

As you're likely aware, ClickFlare defines three user roles: Account Owner, Admin, and Worker. The primary distinction lies in the type of access each role has to both Public and Private Workspaces, as well as Settings. Users can only view statistics relevant to their assigned Workspaces.

  • Account Owner: The individual with comprehensive permissions on the account and access to all Workspaces. The Account Owner can create Private Workspaces, invite Admins and Workers, assign Workers to Private Workspaces, and create or modify campaign elements in both Public and Private Workspaces. Further details can be found in the 'Account Owner Role in ClickFlare: A Comprehensive Guide' article.
  • Admin: Possessing the most extensive permissions after the Account Owner, an Admin can create Private Workspaces, invite Workers, assign them to Private Workspaces, and manage campaign elements in both Public and Private Workspaces. Admins distribute workload on behalf of the Account Owner. Explore more in the 'Admin Role in ClickFlare: A Comprehensive Guide' article.
  • Worker: A person with full access to at least one assigned Private Workspace and limited access to elements in the Public Workspace. Once assigned, a Worker can fully manage campaign funnels within the Private Workspace but cannot view elements (and related statistics) in other Private Workspaces where they are not assigned. This provides isolation for a group of account users to collaborate effectively. Learn more in the 'Worker Role in ClickFlare: A Comprehensive Guide' article.

The diagram below outlines an example of campaign management structure with two Private Workspaces (in addition to the default Public Workspace on each account):


There's always one Public Workspace, where Account Owners and Admins exclusively create campaign elements, having full access to manage them.

Private Workspace A demonstrates that all assigned Workers can manage elements there, but nothing beyond. Public campaign elements, created by Account Owner or Admins, were utilized in Campaigns 1 and 2.

Private Workspace B illustrates that all assigned Workers can manage elements there, but nothing beyond. A public traffic source, created by the Account Owner or Admin, was used in Campaign 3.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Got questions? Find the answers below:

I have the Worker role in ClickFlare and I'm eager to collaborate with fellow Workers on campaign funnels. Can I get limited access to the Public Workspace for seamless teamwork? As a Worker, your permissions don't permit you to create elements in the Public Workspace. However, you can explore these options for effective collaboration:

  1. Reach out to your Account Owner or Admin and request them to create the necessary campaign elements in the Public Workspace.

  2. You and other Workers interested in collaboration can be assigned to the same Private Workspace. This arrangement enables joint efforts on your campaign funnels."

Did this answer your question?